Monthly Archives: March 2012

The Breath

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Imagine that you are only allowed a certain number of breaths in this life before the breath doesn’t enter anymore.

How are you choosing to breathe?  Take a moment right now. Seriously. Now. Pay attention to your breath. Go a head, I’ll wait.

What is it like?  How does it feel? Where does it go in your body?

Now pay attention again and try to make your breath as long as possible.  Slow. Deep. Loooooong.

What happens?  What does it feel like to you? Does it feel different? Are there other effects in your body/mind you notice?

What would it feel like to breathe this way more of the time?

Seriously, I want to know! Share below:)

Admitting when you’re wrong

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This is a hard one but it is so valuable in life and in raising children.  Today I had this experience.  I have these experiences a lot and each time it is another opportunity to actually learn something about myself. To ask the important questions.

Why do I react certain ways? How can I do better for my children?  How can I be the best example for them?

This morning I had poured my last cup of coffee(number 3) and left it on the kitchen table while I went to the bathroom.  Less than a minute later I came out and my daughter said, “I’m so sorry, Mamma, I spilled your coffee”.  It was all over the quilted table runner that my mother had made me.  The cup was completely emptied.

I lost my yoga.

I got really upset and raised my voice.

The funniest thing about this was, while I was acting this way, I KNEW better.  I KNEW it was not that big of a deal.  It was easy enough to clean up, throw the runner in the wash, and really, I didn’t need that third cup of coffee anyway.  But I hung on to my madness.  Isla felt really bad.  It was a complete accident.  Thankfully, it was not long after I had it all cleaned up I went to her an apologized.  I told her I made a mistake to react that way.  The fact that she knocked the mug over was not a big deal at all and that I am working on controling my reactions.

It’s not easy.

Sometimes it stings even more when you’re in it and your “observer”- the loving, highest version of yourself- is watching you act this way and you know it.  This year I made my New Year’s intention to always hold myself to the highest.  To make choices that will positively affect myself and others.

Here was a moment where I didn’t do that.  I am grateful it was only a few moments.  My practice of life has shown me also to forgive myself when I make mistakes.

If I had let it go on and allowed Isla to be upset and cry in her room, to hold onto my anger and the feeling that she was at fault, it would have hurt both of us.  On the other side of that coin, because I admitted my shortcommings, and said I was sorry we both had the opportunity to learn.  I learned that I need to work harder and more diligently on stopping, breathing, and then choosing an action when things happen.  She learned that when you make a mistake, you own up to it.  That no matter how old you are, no matter how much you practice yoga and meditation, no matter how pure your intentions are you still make mistakes, that you make it right, you learn a lesson and move on without holding on to that moment.

Life is the best teacher.

“You are greeted the way you choose to come”

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One of my teachers used this as part of her theme for a class I took months ago and today I saw this lesson applied through my daughter.

We went to the park and there were two girls on scooters in the “skate park”.  Isla has a scooter too and she decided to show the girls how fast she was.  She made her demo and then went up to the girls and said, “I am so fast.  I am way faster that YOU.”  Well, the girls did NOT like to hear that!  They insisted she was not and proceeded to show her.  Their interactions went on in an aggressive and competitive way until finally Isla got so upset she removed herself and started to cry.  I asked her what was the matter and she told me the girls were not being nice to her.

I reminded her of the Law of Karma, you get what you give.  I told her I had observed that the very first thing she said to them was “I am faster than YOU” in a nasty not-so-sweet tone of voice.  Following the Law of Karma, that is what she could expect to get back and it was true.  I recommended that she start over with them.  To say she was sorry for the way she introduced herself before, to tell them her name and to ask their names.  To ask if they would like to ride their scooters fast together.  To show each other cool tricks and have fun! And that is just what happened.  They ended up having a great time together for the remainder of the time we had at the park.

This is more that just a lesson for the playground.

This applies to all of us at all times.  Check in with yourself.  How are you approching life and its challenges?  How do you interact with people who “give you a hard time”?  How can you observe and alter the way you choose to come and witness a miraculous shift in your moments, you days and your life?